Cotton Production in Asia Have Doubled in Past Couple Of Years

Cotton production is an important part of the economy in many countries in Asia. In China, for example, cotton is a key crop in the north-central region of the country. The cotton industry in China is worth an estimated $21 billion, and the country is the world’s largest producer of cotton.

Cotton production is also an important part of the economy in India. India is the second-largest producer of cotton in the world, and the cotton industry is worth an estimated $27 billion. The state of Gujarat is the country’s largest producer of cotton.

In Pakistan, cotton is the most important crop in the country. Cotton production is worth an estimated $5.5 billion, and the country is the fifth-largest producer of cotton in the world. The province of Sindh is the country’s largest producer of cotton.

The cotton industry is an important part of the economy in many other countries in Asia, including Bangladesh, Thailand, and Vietnam. Cotton production is a vital part of the economy in these countries, and it plays a significant role in the overall development of the region.

Asia is the world’s largest producer of cotton, with a total output of about 31 million bales in 2013. India is the top producer, accounting for nearly a third of the global total. China ranks second, with output of about 20 million bales.

Cotton production has been increasing in Asia over the past few years, as rising demand and prices create incentives for farmers to grow the crop. The region is expected to produce about 36 million bales in 2020, up from around 27 million bales in 2013.

The major cotton-growing countries in Asia are India, China, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Thailand, Vietnam and Uzbekistan. India is by far the largest producer, with a 2013 output of about 18 million bales. China ranks second with about 10 million bales, and Pakistan, Bangladesh, Thailand, Vietnam and Uzbekistan are each producing about 5 million bales.

The region’s cotton production is heavily dependent on rainfall, and weather conditions can have a significant impact on the crop. For example, heavy rain in 2011 helped to boost cotton production in Pakistan, while dry weather in 2013 caused a decline in production in Thailand.

Asia’s cotton production is also sensitive to price trends. In 2013, cotton prices jumped to record levels, prompting farmers in some countries to expand their production. However, prices have since declined, and Asia’s cotton producers are now reevaluating their production plans.

Overall, cotton production in Asia is expected to increase in the coming years, as rising demand and prices create incentives for farmers to grow the crop. However, weather conditions and price trends are important factors that can have a significant impact on the crop, and vigilance is required to ensure that production remains sustainable.

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